Harrington Joseph
Sr. Software Engineer
«Accessibility Tips and Tricks»
Jan Nitschke
Data Engineer
«Can we use SQLAlchemy in BI?»
Senior Track
Sam Scott
Co-founder/CTO
«Access control patterns in Python»
Senior Track
Kyle Stanley
CPython core developer
«Contributing to Open Source»
Nadin-Katrin Apel
Software Engineer
«AI at Porsche - how we won the AI Hackaton with postureAI»
Aman Jain
Engineering Lead
«How to validate your startup idea quickly»
Hooman Mohammadi
Software Engineer
«Python Django Intro»
Jim Jagielski
Open Source Lead
«Why Python Matters»
Debora Cornetta O'Brien
Sr. Software Engineer
«How Python changed my life and gave me a position at Google»
Darko Meszaros
Developer Advocate
«Deploying AWS Infrastructure with Python»
Dave Lemphers
Head of Technology
«Data Science with Python IRL»
Margo Cronin
Senior Solutions Architect
«Cryptography, The Cloud and You»
Mark Smith
Senior Developer Advocate
«Everything You Know About MongoDB is Wrong!»
Anmol Krishan Sachdeva
Sr. Software Engineer
«Distributed Orchestration with Airflow: Architecture, DAGs, Best Practices, and more»
Ben Dechrai
Developer Advocate
«Say Goodbye to Passwords and Hello to WebAuthn»
Naomi Ceder
Past Chair
«The Python Software Foundation, the Community and You»
M. Scott Ford
CTO
«A Deep Dive into Measuring Dependency Freshness with LibYear»
Daniel Feldroy
President/COO
«What's Old is New Again: Django and the Front-End»
M. Gurur Yetiskin
Offensive Cyber Security Specialist
«Web Application Security»
Athina Frantzana
Equality, Diversity & Inclusion Specialist-Researcher
«Gender Balance in Tech»
Mohammed Amin Ibrahim
Student
«Building effective online dev portfolio»
Daniel França
Senior Software Engineer
«Django in the serverless land»
Christian Barra
Tech Lead
«Websockets and webhooks done right»
Paweł Polewicz
CEO
«ApiVer – a versioning policy for libraries»
Emanuil Tolev
Community Engineer
«The gentle touch of APM - how code tracing works in Python»
Anastasiia Tymoshchuk
Lead Engineer
«Can we deploy yet?»
Shreya Agrawal
Data Scientist
«Data Science in Urban Mobility»
Fernando Medina Corey
Lead Cloud Architect
«Scalable Application Prototyping in 500 Lines or Less»
Harrington Joseph
Sr. Software Engineer
TOPIC:
Managing Scale and Complexy. An Event Driven Approach
Aman Jain
Engineering Lead
TOPIC:
How to validate your startup idea quickly
Hooman Mohammadi
Software Engineer
TOPIC:
Python Django Intro
Managing Scale and Complexy. An Event Driven Approach
Coupled services, tangled endpoints and pooling mechanisms are usually the result of an organically growth architecture. Unfortunately, as the scale increases, the complexity and constraints do as well.

The purpose of this talk is to expose how quickly complexity grows, and how a unified event driven architecture approach, enables the support of more complex infrastructures that require to be flexible and scalable. Additionally, it covers best practices, pros and cons; and how I have used this approach at Netflix to drive a platform that leverages more than 300 million events a day.

This talks aims to target mid to advanced level engineers who have experienced problem scaling services or dealing with complex architectures. The expectation is that after this talk, everyone walks away understanding the power of events, and how they can be leveraged to design architectures for large scale problems.
How to validate your startup idea quickly
I work at Facebook's Innovation Lab as an Engineering Lead. As part of that, I help with rapidly prototyping and building brand new apps. One of the key learning is that most new product ideas will fail in the market, even if the execution is good.

This doesn't mean that we shouldn't try building something new. But it means that we should try to validate if the market is interested in your idea before spending a lot of time and money building it. In this talk, I describe a playbook you can use to gain confidence that the market wants your product in a matter of a few days.

I've already written an article about it that got a lot of recognition on Hacker News and Twitter.
https://amanjain.substack.com/p/how-to-validate-your-startup-idea
Python Django Intro
How Django is used for web services design and prototyping MVP ideas
Jim Jagielski
Open Source Lead
TOPIC:
Why Python Matters
Debora Cornetta O'Brien
Software Engineer Apprentice
TOPIC:
How Python changed my life and gave me a position at Google
Darko Meszaros
Developer Advocate
TOPIC:
Deploying AWS Infrastructure with Python
Why Python Matters
It seems that every week a new language is announced, each one designed to become *the* language for the web, for devops, and for applications. But through it all, Python still continues to not only survive but to thrive. What is it about Python that makes it still the go to language in tech?
How Python changed my life and gave me a position at Google
Before July last year I had never heard of Python. Today I have a contract signed with Google after getting in their Software Engineer Apprenticeship programme. I'm going to tell you how I did it, so that you can do it too!
Deploying AWS Infrastructure with Python
One of the parts of doing things properly at scale is being able to describe your infrastructure as code and deploy it as such. If we already treat our infrastructure as code, why not apply all the best practices of software delivery to infrastructure delivery.
In this session we look into Infrastructure as Code, the Python way! Let's see how can we use tools such as AWS Cloud Development Kit, to deploy our Infrastructure with the power of Python.
Dave Lemphers
Head of Technology
TOPIC:
Data Science with Python IRL
Margo Cronin
Senior Solutions Architect
TOPIC:
Cryptography, The Cloud and You
Mark Smith
Senior Developer Advocate
TOPIC:
Everything You Know About MongoDB is Wrong!
Data Science with Python IRL
In this session, Dave will cover what it’s like to work as an Applied Data Scientist in industry and will discuss everything from coming up with good hunches, the tao of feature engineering, how to avoid model fixation, and the difference between thinking deterministically versus probabilistically. He’ll cover the tool-chain pro data scientists use, what it is like to be embedded in a product team, and how to develop your career in one of the fastest growing technical disciplines.
Cryptography, The Cloud and You
When discussing adoption of AWS and cloud native practices I often find myself talking about encryption. The topics can range around a wide variety of topics from "how can I implement DevSecOps" to "is my data safe in the cloud" to "what about the Cloud Act" to "who can access my data" or even "what about quantum computing". We often go to encryption in these topics and customers are not aware of how easy it is to leverage encryption services in the cloud. This speech will focus on the flexibility the Python SDKs give a customer to generate symmetric or assymetric keys. The implication of AWS generating keys. The implication of choosing symmetric over assymetric encryption. I do work for AWS but this is not a sales speech, I will show Python code to generate and encrypt data (assymetric and symmetric).
Everything You Know About MongoDB is Wrong!
MongoDB is webscale, right? It's a JSON database, it's eventually consistent, and you use map-reduce to query it. Oh, and it's insecure.

Let me clear up some things: MongoDB is an ACID-compliant database with transactions, schemas & relationships. It includes a powerful aggregation query language; map-reduce has been deprecated for some time now. MongoDB doesn't speak or store JSON, and nowadays it comes with pretty good security defaults (we think).

There are many myths around about MongoDB - what it is, how it works, and what it does wrong. Like any database product, you need to know its capabilities and how to get the best out of it. On top of this, the product has changed _a lot_ over the years, but lots of information out there hasn't caught up.

I'll cover 8 myths around MongoDB, explain how they're wrong, why the myth originated in the first place (some of them weren't originally myths).

* What exactly _is_ MongoDB?
* What is the current release of MongoDB?
* MongoDB is _not_ a JSON database.
* MongoDB _has_ transactions.
* MongoDB allows relationships.
* You should only consider sharding if you _must_.
* MongoDB _is secure_.
* MongoDB stores your data reliably.
* MongoDB is a big product, with lots to learn.

Along the way, I'll explain some of MongoDB's best-kept secrets, and provide practical tips and tricks for using it. The audience will leave with a good idea of what MongoDB is, what it isn't, and how to best develop with it.
Anmol Krishan Sachdeva
Site Reliability Engineer
TOPIC:
Distributed Orchestration with Airflow: Architecture, DAGs, Best Practices, and more
Ben Dechrai
Developer Advocate
TOPIC:
Say Goodbye to Passwords and Hello to WebAuthn
Naomi Ceder
Past Chair
TOPIC:
The Python Software Foundation, the Community and You
Distributed Orchestration with Airflow: Architecture, DAGs, Best Practices, and more
Distributed Orchestration with Airflow: Architecture, DAGs, Best Practices, and more

With the amount of data growing day-by-day and businesses becoming more dependent on data for making decisions and predictions, engineers have started utilizing more number of diverse tools/platforms to meet the requirements. This has been possible with added manageability and financial overhead. A lot of different tools/platforms/components have to be chained together so that data can flow between them.

The talk aims at introducing Airflow for orchestrating the workflow by creating sophisticated data pipelines which are optimized for performance, resources, and cost.

The following things would be discussed:
- Understanding the basics of Data Pipelining
- Importance of DAGs and comparison with Crons
- Architecture of Airflow
- Distributed Workflow management using Celery and Kubernetes
- Best practices for DAGs
- How to optimise for resources and cost
- Q/A
Say Goodbye to Passwords and Hello to WebAuthn
Identifying ourselves to access social media, banking details, and every aspect of our online life is something we do potentially dozens of times a day.

But as the nearly ten billion leaked account details documented by "';--have i been pwned?" attest, this process has a fatal weakness–passwords.

The Web Authentication API (or WebAuthn) is a standard from the W3C and FIDO that "allows servers to register and authenticate users using public key cryptography instead of a password". WebAuthn is part of a set of standards that enable passwordless authentication between servers, browsers, and authenticators. It's supported in all modern browsers.

This presentation will outline how the technologies work, and how you can take advantage of them today to create a far more secure experience for your users.
The Python Software Foundation, the Community and You
The Python Software Foundation is a global organization whose mission both the advancement of Python and the fostering of communities around the world. What does that mean? What does the PSF actually do? How can YOU get involved? Join me for a survey of what the PSF is and what it does, and learn how anyone, with any level of Python knowledge, anywhere in the world, can get involved with the PSF and Python communities around the world.
M. Scott Ford
CTO
TOPIC:
A Deep Dive into Measuring Dependency Freshness with LibYear
Daniel Feldroy
President/COO
TOPIC:
What's Old is New Again: Django and the Front-End
M. Gurur Yetiskin
Offensive Cyber Security Specialist
TOPIC:
Web Application Security
Building a Bridge to a Legacy Application - How Hard Can that Be?
My team loves working on legacy code projects. It’s all that we do. That’s why a friend of mine reached out to us for some help.

His startup was building out a universal API across a very fragmented industry with little to no interoperability or standards. Up until now, integrating with the systems in that industry had been pretty easy, because the companies that built them were willing to help.

But now he’d found one that wasn’t willing to help. There was no obvious API for getting data out of the legacy application so that it could be exposed via his company’s API. A big client for his company was riding on his ability to be able to pull this off. He remembered how much I loved a challenge and how much my team loved legacy code, so he figured we were his best shot.

The goal was to be able to read from the application’s database.

In this talk, I’ll cover:

the different approaches that we took
the one we really wanted to try because we thought it would be fun
the approaches that we needed to try before we could attempt the fun one
the excitement that we felt while working on it
the grind toward completion once the big technical hurdle was crossed
the sense of achievement when we got a read-only solution built
the hope that we’d get the green light to start working on a read-write solution
the disappointment when the plug got pulled and we weren’t authorized to proceed any further
It was a fun journey, and I’d love to be able to share it.
Building a Bridge to a Legacy Application - How Hard Can that Be?
My team loves working on legacy code projects. It’s all that we do. That’s why a friend of mine reached out to us for some help.

His startup was building out a universal API across a very fragmented industry with little to no interoperability or standards. Up until now, integrating with the systems in that industry had been pretty easy, because the companies that built them were willing to help.

But now he’d found one that wasn’t willing to help. There was no obvious API for getting data out of the legacy application so that it could be exposed via his company’s API. A big client for his company was riding on his ability to be able to pull this off. He remembered how much I loved a challenge and how much my team loved legacy code, so he figured we were his best shot.

The goal was to be able to read from the application’s database.

In this talk, I’ll cover:

the different approaches that we took
the one we really wanted to try because we thought it would be fun
the approaches that we needed to try before we could attempt the fun one
the excitement that we felt while working on it
the grind toward completion once the big technical hurdle was crossed
the sense of achievement when we got a read-only solution built
the hope that we’d get the green light to start working on a read-write solution
the disappointment when the plug got pulled and we weren’t authorized to proceed any further
It was a fun journey, and I’d love to be able to share it.
Web Application Security
I will give a presentation on Security Tools and Testing, Web Application Attacks.
Athina Frantzana
Equality, Diversity & Inclusion Specialist-Researcher
TOPIC:
Gender Balance in Tech
Mohammed Amin Ibrahim
Student
TOPIC:
Building effective online dev portfolio
Daniel França
Senior Software Engineer
TOPIC:
Django in the serverless land
Gender Balance in Tech
Why are women still underrepresented in Tech, and why does it matter? In this talk we will discuss the reasons for the gender imbalance in the Tech community, the problems this causes to the community and the world, the benefits of increasing women's representation, and the effectiveness of a range of approaches designed to improve gender diversity.
Building effective online dev portfolio
Django in the serverless land
Provisioning, scaling and maintaining your application can still be a challenge, leading to errors and demanding highly specific knowledge.
Serverless introduces a new architecture and execution model; ephemeral containers run the application or service on-demand making it scalable by design, but it also introduces new challenges.

This talk shows you how a Django application can take full advantage of AWS to become serverless with the help of the Zappa framework and shares lessons learned from experience.
Christian Barra
Tech Lead
TOPIC:
Websockets and webhooks done right
Paweł Polewicz
CEO
TOPIC:
ApiVer – a versioning policy for libraries
Emanuil Tolev
Community Engineer
TOPIC:
The gentle touch of APM - how code tracing works in Python
Websockets and webhooks done right
Websockets and webhooks serve like a backbone of a modern real-time API system, providing a way to communicate in real-time changes or updates.

During this talk I’ll introduce what websockets and webhooks are, why and for what they are useful, some of the security issues you need to be aware of and how to use Python to write a websocket client/server and a webhook producer/consumer.

Especially for webhooks I’ll talk about the complexity of creating a reliable system that can scale to hundreds of webhooks, of the necessary retry policies you need to support and of the strategies you can put in place to alleviate slow or faulty consumers.
ApiVer – a versioning policy for libraries
ApiVer is an evolution of SemVer 2.0.0 – the well-known and well-designed standard which ends up leaving some challenges that hamper productivity in the long term. This talk will explain why it is worth it to acquaint yourself with ApiVer and how you can use it to reduce maintenance overhead and improve the experience of your library’s users.

ApiVer allows non-backward compatible changes to signatures such as the addition of mandatory function parameters and deleting methods from public interfaces without breaking the functionality of the software that uses a library upon upgrade. It also ensures that minor bugfixes and performance optimizations of old functions remain available to everyone without the need to backport anything to the old branches.
The gentle touch of APM - how code tracing works in Python
It has been a busy several years in monitoring and observability. As we’ve hit limits on the visibility and detail that logging and metrics provide, we’ve turned to tracing and APM (App Performance Monitoring) systems. We can now understand performance bottlenecks and see errors in our apps down to the line of code. But how do they really work under the hood? Come and find out! We'll walk through how a free APM system works - Elastic APM.

- Elastic APM's tech architecture
- how its Python agent hooks deep into web apps and batch task processing back-ends
- how web frameworks allow us to perform tracing more easily than you might think

This talk is friendly to a variety of backgrounds and levels of experience. It would help a lot if you have worked on a production web app, but the focus is on giving an introduction.
Anastasiia Tymoshchuk
Lead Engineer
TOPIC:
Can we deploy yet?
Shreya Agrawal
Data Scientist
TOPIC:
Data Science in Urban Mobility
Fernando Medina Corey
Lead Cloud Architect
TOPIC:
Scalable Application Prototyping in 500 Lines or Less
Can we deploy yet?
What happens when your features are done, your MVP is ready and you want to deploy your first production build? What do you do then? How do you make your first production build instead of re-using your development one? is your code ready to handle real user interactions?
This talk will show a production ready checklist for your Python code; what to look for when creating a production-ready Docker image; what are the differences between development and production environments and builds.
You will see how to deal with exceptions, logs, docker files with real-world use cases.
Data Science in Urban Mobility
Geospatial data has increased rapidly in the last decade and has challenged the traditional mobility companies to adopt more data-driven approach to solve the problem of urban mobility. In this talk, I will discuss the changing scope of data in urban mobility, emergence of last-mile mobility options, focussing on two key topics - surge pricing and demand prediction.
Scalable Application Prototyping in 500 Lines or Less
This talk will demonstrate how to rapidly develop application prototypes in the cloud. It will showcase how to spin up a few sample applications inside of Amazon Web Services using the Serverless Framework.

In this process, it will show how a combination of managed services, libraries, and 3rd party tools can build a web application that collects user-generated content and makes it immediately searchable - all in under 500 lines of user-written code.

Using an example prototype the talk will demonstrate how to use a "Code Budget" in order to spend a minimal amount of time on development and produce a Minimum Viable Product or MVP quickly.